The Hotness
Civilization VI
Galaxy of Trian
Hearthstone: Heroes of Warcraft
Street Fighter II: Special Champion Edition
Mordheim: City of the Damned
Lethal League
LEGO City: Undercover
Dominion Online
Star Trek
The Silent Age
Emergency 2014
Lionheart Tactics
Pokémon GO
Pathfinder Adventures
Dark Souls III - Ashes of Ariandel
Cabals: Card Blitz
Final Fantasy
Final Fantasy III
Super Mario Bros. 3
Ninja Gaiden
Chrono Trigger
Double Dragon
Mass Effect: Bring Down the Sky
The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past
Mario Kart 64
Plants vs. Zombies
Age of Mythology
California Games
Zork I: The Great Underground Empire
Evil Genius
Posideon: Master of Atlantis
Planet M.U.L.E.
Civilization Chronicles
Panzer General II
Pacific General
Sins of a Solar Empire
Al-Qadim: The Genie's Curse
Portal 2
Star Wars: Episode I: Racer
Star Wars: Rebellion
Star Trek: Starfleet Command II – Empires at War
Resident Evil: Deadly Silence
Deadly Rooms of Death
Primary Name
Alternate Names
wrong website?
 Customize View
xml RSS Feed 
Facebook Twitter Delicious Google
ObjectID: 12398
Description Edit | History

From Wikipedia

The company is most famous for creating the PC game The 7th Guest, one of the first computer games for CD-ROM. Most of the footage for the game was filmed with a US$35,000 budget, Super VHS cameras, and blue butcher paper as a background that would later be removed to help insert the actors in the game, a process called chromakey, or bluescreen). The game was a puzzle-solving game similar in style to Myst. However, most of the puzzles in The 7th Guest were based on versions of real puzzles invented by people such as Max Bezzel, while the puzzles in Myst were mostly fantasy-based. Also, The 7th Guest's puzzles were mostly independent from their environment, whereas Myst's puzzles were heavily integrated into the environment. For the time, it had amazing graphics by Robert Stein III, Gene Bodio, Alan Iglesias, George P. Burdell, MIDI music by The Fat Man, and an interesting story by Matthew J. Costello. During planning, a sequel was already being considered in anticipation of success. The final version of The 7th Guest was released in 1993. 60,000 copies were snapped up overnight, and a bevy of requests for reorders arrived days later. When the game was released, some CD-ROM manufacturers registered up to a 300 percent increase in sales for CD-ROM drives.

Overall, the game proved to be a turning point in CD-ROM based technology. If not for the popularity of The 7th Guest and Myst, a similar-styled adventure game, the CD-ROM would not have been as popular and would have taken longer to gain a foothold in the marketplace.

The 11th Hour was released in the fall of 1995, after missing its original release date by more than a year. It was one of the first games to support 16-bit color. Graphically, the game was superb for the time. It featured detailed environments and fluid motion. However, the game drew criticism for several reasons. The game was released in DOS when Windows 95 had already been out for some time. The company was flooded with callers trying to get the game to run on their machines. The game still used MIDI for music, instead of CD audio. In addition, the gameplay was not well received by some, with players getting angry at the puzzles and riddles they had to solve, ranging from abstract logic to anagrams. Despite the massive amount of pre-orders from vendors, sales ended up being far below the expected amount, and the game did not recover its production costs, a key factor in the company's financial downfall.

The next projects for Trilobyte were published by Trilobyte itself. Clandestiny, with gameplay similar to the previous The 7th Guest, and The 11th Hour, though using cel animated (cartoon) video rather than live action, and Uncle Henry's Playhouse, a re-packaging of a number of the puzzles and games from The 7th Guest, The 11th Hour, and Clandestiny. However, neither of them did well commercially, and they are not well-known.

After Clandestiny, the company effectively took two internal directions. Landeros led a project called Tender Loving Care, while Devine started a Massively Multiplayer project, Millennium. Tender Loving Care (starring John Hurt), often referred to simply as TLC, was completed in 1998.

About the same time, Red Orb Entertainment, a division of Brøderbund, signed on to publish two titles on Devine's "side" of the company — Assault!, a top-down multiplayer action game, and Extreme Racing, a racing game, which ran on a shared game engine. Red Orb was also publishing the games Riven and Prince of Persia 3D at the time. Assault! was later renamed Extreme Warfare and changed from top-down to a first person perspective. Extreme Racing was likewise retitled Baja 1000 Racing and attached to a SCORE International racing license. Both games made appearances at the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) trade show that year.

Thumbs Up
Category: Language:
1 « Pg. {{module.params.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
No videos found
{{video.numrecommend}} {{video.title}} {{video.language}} {{video.username|truncate:"10"}} {{video.numcomments}}
Thumbs Up
1 « Pg. {{module.params.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
No images found
Thumbs Up
{{data.config.moduletitle}} Relationship:
[] [Forums »] [Post »] [Search »]
1 « Pg. {{module.params.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
No threads found
{{thread.numrecommend}} {{thread.subject}}
Last Post {{thread.lastpostdate|truncate:"10"}} Posted {{thread.postdate|truncate:"10"}}
{{thread.user.username|truncate:"10"}} {{thread.numposts-1}}
Thumbs Up
{{data.config.moduletitle}} Relationship:
[] [Forums »] [Post »] [Search »]
1 « Pg. {{module.params.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
No threads found
{{thread.numrecommend}} {{thread.subject}}
Last Post {{thread.lastpostdate|truncate:"10"}} Posted {{thread.postdate|truncate:"10"}}
{{thread.user.username|truncate:"10"}} {{thread.numposts-1}}
Linked Items
Relationship: Sort: Genre: Theme: Mode: Media:
Pg. 1
Rank 5389
Num Ratings 11
Average Rating 5.73
Average Weight 0.00
Num Owned 55
Prev. Owned 7
For Trade 1
Want in Trade 0
Wishlist 2
Comments 4
Release Date 1995-12-13
Rank 1775
Num Ratings 72
Average Rating 6.53
Average Weight 3.50
Num Owned 133
Prev. Owned 33
For Trade 3
Want in Trade 2
Wishlist 5
Comments 12
Release Date 1993-04-00
Rank N/A
Num Ratings 0
Average Rating 0.00
Average Weight 0.00
Num Owned 3
Prev. Owned 0
For Trade 0
Want in Trade 0
Wishlist 0
Comments 0
Release Date 2011-04-27
Thumbs Up
[Browse »] [Summary »]
1 « Pg. {{module.params.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
No lists found
{{list.numpositive}} {{list.title}} {{list.username|truncate:"10"}} {{list.numitems}}
{{list.lastreplydate|truncate:"10"}} {{list.postdate|truncate:"10"}}
Thumbs Up
1 « Pg. {{module.params.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
No posts found
{{post.numpositive}} {{post.title}}
Thumbs Up
Web Links
Category: Language:
1 « Pg. {{module.params.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
No Web Links Found
Link {{cat}} {{lang}}
Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.