Literary New To You September 2017 => Books you read this month
Andy Howell
United States
Alexandria
Virginia
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100 Years of Coast Guard Aviation!
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Those dang kids just keep growin'
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Bookish types love nothing more than a bibliography, especially book lists generated by like-minded (or not so like-minded) readers.

Please share what you've been reading with your fellow gamers!
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1. Board Game: Marvel Dice Masters: Avengers vs. X-Men - Hawkeye: Avengers Disassembled [Average Rating:6.48 Unranked] [Average Rating:6.48 Unranked]
Board Game: Brettspiel Adventskalender 2015
Andy Howell
United States
Alexandria
Virginia
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100 Years of Coast Guard Aviation!
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Weird month, September, kids back to school, Cub Scouts ramps up, etc.

I got a shipment of comics back from Herring and Robinson bookbinders. They'll bind up 2" of comics for a base price of $18/book. Makes them easy to read, keep on a shelf, and share with the kids. Here's a pile of Fractiony goodness with a little Grant Morrison thrown in.

From gallery of AndyHowell


Bro, Reading Fraction/Aja's Hawkeye straight through for the first time - I'm willing to go out on a limb and say it's a masterpiece bro. Bro seriously, seriously bro this book is good. Tons of little details layered over each other. His relationship with Kate, Pizzadog, and of course the Hurricane Sandy issue are some of the highest points in the superhero genre, bro.

Morrison's Action was my favorite thing about the New 52 by a mile. Such a cool retelling of Clark's early career. Supes with jeans and a t-shirt, Lex swilling red bull, talking on his cell phone to Brainiac, delicious!

Both highly recommended!
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2. Video Game: Lucky Luke [2000] [Average Rating:6.00 Unranked]
Video Game: Lucky Luke [2000]
Luke Jaconetti
United States
Simpsonville
South Carolina
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Lucky Luke Tome 65: Ghost Hunt -- Got the digital copy of this for free from the Amazon Kindle store (as of today, it and Tome 66 are both still free). I discovered Lucky Luke via the GBC video game -- which is to say, I saw it in a shop and was amazed to see a fictional cowboy named Luke, as us Lukes need to stick together. Anyway, this is a 50+ page story about Luke and Calamity Jane escorting a stage coach after the previous stage coach mysterious disappeared in a "ghost town." Luke is very much his typical easy going self, but Jane is a foul mouthed frontier woman who uses a lot of colorful language in the form of various symbolic expletives. Some good comedy is mined from the juxtaposition of Jane and the civilized ladies on the stagecoach, and the art is the typically wonderful European cartoony look the strip is famous for. Fun read.

At The Earth's Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs -- After watching Mystery Science Theater 3000's season 11 episode covering the Amicus film adaptation, I broke out a digital copy of the slim novel to re-read. The story is pretty familiar, as a young man and old professor from the surface find themselves trapped in Pelucidar, the strange "world within a world" at the center of the Earth, where they must fight back against the vicious Mahars who rule with both their claws and their mental powers. Burroughs very straight ahead, first person style can be seen as "old fashioned," but I really enjoy it. Definitely a product of its time, but still a fun read, along with all of the other Burroughs stuff I have read in the past year.

Savage -- Trade paperback from Valiant Comics. Word of warning, Valiant is my favorite comics publisher currently, and has been for several years. Savage is (so far) a one-off 4 issue miniseries telling the story of a professional footballer, his business manager wife, and their infant son who end up crash landed on a tropical island. Only this island hides many secrets, the least of which is that it is populated by dinosaurs. Taken on its own merits as a jungle survival action tale, I liked this book, although it read pretty quickly. From the end of the story and the rumors, we have not seen the last of Savage, so this volume may lead to more. For now, its a good if non-essential Valiant volume.

Marvel Classics Comics #32: White Fang -- After finding issue #18, featuring The Odyssey, a few years back at Heroes Con, I have worked up a decent little collection of this series, Marvel's take on Classics Illustrated. This one is adapted by Doug Moench and Tony DeZuniga. I read this one because my oldest boy had gotten White Fang for Christmas and tore through it (as he does many books), so I had gotten it out for him to read. Since I had not had a chance to read it either, I took the opportunity to do so. I like these Marvel ones because after the first dozen or so, they have Marvel regular artists doing the visuals, so they look much more interesting and dynamic than their Classics Illustrated cohorts.

The Uncanny X-Men paperback (collecting #110, 123-124) -- A pocketbook paperback. The first story features Warhawk attacking the X-Men and trapping them in the Danger Room, while the second story is a two parter where the team is forced to run through Murderworld by Arcade. Strong Claremont stories are paired with Dave Cockrum and Tony DeZuniga, then with John Byrne and Terry Austin, and it all looks rather lovely in black and white. Picked this up for a buck or so a while back, I have a lot of affection for the Claremont X-Men run even if I have not read a lot of it. Cool stuff.

Captain America Battles Baron Blood paperback (collecting #250, 253-254) -- "Marvel Illustrated Books" pocketbook. The first story (which chronologically is actually the second) features Cap returning to England and doing battle with the vampirific Baron Blood, and old foe from WWII. The second story is about Captain America being offered a third party candidacy for the office of President, and the repercussions that holds. By Roger Stern and John Byrne, the lead story is great Cap action, while the second feature is much more thoughtful. Got this in the same lot as the X-Men book, also worth checking out.

The Shadow: Blood And Judgement -- Story and art by Howard Chaykin. Picked this old school trade up from the used book store, and it was well worth it. This story doesn't treat the Shadow as a period character, instead bringing him right there into the present day (read, the 80s as this was written in 1986). Violent and nihilistic, this series does not turn away from the inherent darkness of a madman whose single purpose is the eradication of crime, and uses a large, spiderweb network of agents to do his bidding. Our "hero" is a man out of time in the worst way, a borderline misogynist sexist who uses whoever he needs to in order to get what he wants. The story is hard boiled, the art is gorgeous, and the overall feeling of a pulp set in the 1980s is effectively achieved.
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3. RPG Item: The Golden Dawn [Average Rating:8.10 Overall Rank:277]
RPG Item: The Golden Dawn
Jason Cookingham
United States
Poughkeepsie
New York
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I read a lot of good books this month, but a few turkeys as well.

Very Good

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Lovecraft Country by Matt Ruff
I could ramble quite a bit about my mixed feelins about Lovecraft.
This book takes the interesting tact to show that the racism African Americans have had to deal with (particular in the 1950s for this book) is as much a horror... if not worse, then the potential existential dread of the Mythos. I do wish it bent a bit more into the horror of both sides, but I liked it a lot.

I have read that NK Jemisin (who I will be listening to speak in a few minutes) is writing a book along similar lines. Really looking forward to that.

The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
I have not read much of Atwood, but she does an incredible job of feeling the ugliness that can be in life.

Good

The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson
I liked the setting, and the story was fine. I am not sure I will read any more of the series.

Kangaroo Too by Curtis Chen
It is not as funny as the first one, but it has its moments.

Poetics by Aristotle
His look at what makes a good tragedy. Very interesting stuff, but I wish I waited to read this after exploring more greek plays.

Alcestis and Other plays by Euripides
The first two were good. The one with Heracles was a bit weak.

Lysistrata by Aristophanes
Wow. I wasn't expecting a greek play to be this graphic, but it was funny and good.

Adulthood Rites by Octavia Butler
2nd book in the Xenogensis series. I am not sure it has much more to say about the setting or the characters, but I enjoyed my time in their world.

Babylon's Ashes by James S A Corey
A deus ex machine in the end taints the book a bit, but it was a little bit earned. Fun read.

1984 by George Orwell
A good companion read to Adulthood Rites. Both note the hierarchical of many has the potential to be very destructive and self-destructive.

Okay

The Strange Case of the Alchemist's Daughter by Theodora Goss
The daughter of Jeckyl meets the daughter of Hyde (and others). They have adventures! A fun idea is marred by a silly narrative gimmick that doesn't entertain nor inform.

Sex Criminals, Vol 1 by Matt Fraction
A fun idea is distracted from by silly antagonists.

Fullmetal Alchemists, Vol 1 by Hiromu Arakawa
A fun idea for setting and characters, but I didn't like the writing that much.

All-Star Superman, vol 1 by Grant Morrison
It is okay.

Bad
Uzumaki, Vol.1
I was bored.
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4. Board Game: A Day Out with Thomas [Average Rating:2.66 Unranked]
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Curtis Thompson
Canada
Calgary
Alberta
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Reading Thomas Covenant the unbeliever: Lord Foul's Name by Stephen Donaldson. Came out in 77 and is supposed to be influential within the genre and has also caused a lot of debate between people who love it or hate it. I'm on the fence about it. The world building is decent, but draws a lot of comparisons to Tolkien. Covenant is an interesting character and meant to be an anti-hero. I don't mind anti-herows but I find him very frustrating and might not continue with the series.
Likely read more of Daniel Abraham next. Really enjoy his books so far.
CT
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5. Board Game: Groo: The Game [Average Rating:6.29 Overall Rank:3941]
Board Game: Groo: The Game
A lot of comics again.

DC: The New Frontier. I haven't read many DC comics so take my opinion of this as uninformed, but this was really good. You don't really need any prior DC knowledge. This is a whole new origin for all of the characters. The Cooke art got me to try it out. The story and dialogue was so good i read the whole thing in one day.

Usagi #161
Groo: Fray of the Gods #3.
TMNT/Usagi crossover


I don't buy single issues for anything except Usagi and Groo. Usagi is probably my favorite series.

The TMNT crossover was good but it could have been a four issue mini series. With it just being one issue it doesn't feel long enough. I do like that the story distinguishes the IDW turtles from the Mirage ones.

Usagi has met the turtles a couple times in his 33 years of comics. This is the first time he's met the IDW version.


The Duck Avenger #1-3 this is a more modern almost scifi version of the Duck Avenger. And it might be the best thing IDW has put out so far. Each issue is around 70 pages and is a satisfying story arc.

Dragonball Vol. #1-5 This is my second time reading Dragonball all the way through. The last time was about 6 years ago. The last time i read it too quickly and didn't spend enough time with the later volumes. I'm going to go slower this time and try to appreciate it more. I prefer Dragonball to Z because it feels like more of an adventure and the support cast is more relevant. Although I've never read the Dragonball Z manga. My opinion might change slightly if i ever do that.


Dr. Doom and the Masters of Evil. #1-4.

This is a very silly Doom story. Not much to say, it reads quick and the ending is funny.


Future Quest #1-6. This is a DC series that combines all of the "serious" Hanna-Barbera cartoons. It still has some light comedy, but they've taken the liberty to make most of it a little more serious.

I thought it was great. It has just the right amount of seriousness and comedy. I'm looking forward to volume 2. I'm a fan of the first 3 seasons of Venture Bros and it seems like Race is treated more like Brock Samson, but without the adult themes.
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6. Board Game: The Really Nasty Horse Racing Game [Average Rating:6.27 Overall Rank:4291]
Board Game: The Really Nasty Horse Racing Game
Anne Skelding
United States
Connecticut
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I super loved this one. It's kind of adorable? I mean, it's fierce and bloody and periodically someone dies, but it's also tender and sweet. All Sean wants is to be left alone with his horse-monster. All Puck wants is for her family to be together and happy. Seeing them learn to trust and care for each other is a treat.



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Here's an interesting one. Writing in verse is hard to pull off, especially these days when so many people consider poetry pretentious or obscure. I like poetry, but I am still deeply suspicious of the idea of a novel told in verse. Nor, for that matter, am I interested in sports.

Read it anyway, said the person who recommended it to me. Just trust me.

So I did. And I was not disappointed.

The words, story, and emotions pull you right in. I would have read this book in one sitting, only I had to call into a work meeting halfway through, so it was technically two sittings.

Honestly, it's just a slice of life for a high school kid. He and his twin brother are stars on their school basketball team, but his brother gets a girlfriend, so there's Drama. To top it off, he thinks his dad is sick. The plot is probably something you've seen before, but the presentation makes you FEEL the raw emotion this kid is going through.

A very interesting experience, all in all. Not sure if I would want to read more like it, but it really worked and I enjoyed it a lot.



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Now you too can read about Charles Darwin's grandpa's plant fetifh!

Of courfe, he wraps it up in a lot of metaphors about various gods and goddefses, and has some very nice imagery, but really, moft of it if about plants having fex with themfelves.

Alfo, if you couldn't tell, the verfion I read was, I believe, a tranfcription of the original text, which means that moft of the "s" letters were written as "f." An added layer of ftress for the modern reader. I might have liked it more if it didn't. Oh well, too late now.



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So this is an odd book. Mind you, Young Wizards frequently has bizarre situations; in the first book, the characters almost get eaten by a nest full of baby carnivorous helicopters. But see, that's my kind of weird--I have loved almost everything the series has done so far.

So know that when I say that this book is odd it's not exactly a criticism. However, in this case, the strangeness detracted from my enjoyment. Look, we're in an old sci-fi movie! Now we're in an HG Wells book/movie! And now in an Edgar Rice Burroughs novel?

Weird.

I still liked it in the end, but I would say it's the weakest in the series so far.


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Yes, I've never read Good Omens before this. I know, I know. It's been on my list, I just hadn't gotten around to it. Pratchett and Gaiman bring out the best (and worst, in the best way) of each other in this book.


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I've never read anything by Mira Grant that wasn't brilliant. This is, indeed, brilliant, and also terrifying, sobering, and with an ending that I did not expect. Not as good as the Newsflesh books, but I still really enjoyed it.



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Holy shit, this this amazing. Absolutely stunning. It's everything I wanted it to be and more. Atypical fantasy setting. Mysterious lady protagonist on a quest that is part revenge and part unknown even to her. Monster that might be an ally or might eat them for breakfast, depending on its mood. Brave but adorable child character. A proliferation of cats. And that knife twist at the end, the devastating little detail that the heroes don't know about yet. *hugs book* Just perfect.


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Ehh... *wobbles hand* I really liked the characters, but as for the rest, let's just say that Phillip Pullman clearly grew a lot, both as a writer and as a person, between this book and His Dark Materials.


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I adore the Graveyard Book, and the illustrations in this are well done (though I cannot figure out why Silas would be wearing a Bela Lugosi cape; he is neither in cinema nor theater, and so doesn't need to hide any special effects!).

However, as a comic book, this does far too much telling and not enough showing. It seems like entire passages of the book are copied into narrative boxes. What's the point of making a graphic novel if you're not going to turn the novel into graphics?



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Absolutely delightful. The first half is very like the movie, and the second half is very different, and I love them both!
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7. Board Game: Air Aces [Average Rating:5.00 Unranked]
Board Game: Air Aces
Ivan
Russia
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Ivan Nikitovich Kozhedub - Searching for fight

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Alexander Ivanovich Pokryshkin - Poznat' sebya v boyu (Know yourself in combat)

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Memoirs by two glorified Soviet fighter pilots, both of them has three Hero of the Soviet Union golden stars, top scoring fighter pilots on the Allied side during World War II.

I read both of these books consistently - one after another. Each pilot has his own path, but there are also common features uniting both Soviet aces:
1) Were born in common families. They have to work since childhood. They persistently studied. Became pilots, came to military aircraft.
2) Creatively treated their service:
- the fighting experience (correction of mistakes), experience of their colleagues, other pilots, even enemies analyzed;
- attentively studied the plane to understand its opportunities;
- developed and personally fulfilled new methods of air fight and other fighter tasks (for example, covering bombers and other planes; patrol, etc.)
3) They understood value of good physical conditions for the fighting pilot (overloads, oxygen starvation at height (if there is problem with oxygen mask), big physical and psychological activities) and trained regularly.
4) НNot only studied new elements, new tactics, but also trained other pilots, understanding that they have been doing the same task.
5) The main part of their air victories they got during the second half of war (after 1942):
- Pokryshkin - the skilled pilot who was torn to shoot down enemy planes, his command sent for attacking ground targets and intelligence flights, abused for him for his innovative methods of air fight, too long refused to change obsoletw group tactics;
- Kozhedub served as instructor at military college and came to the front only in 1943.
6) They were courageous and resourceful persons.

Excellent books written by uncommon authors.


A. J. Cronin - Hatter's Castle

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The drama of the Scottish family at the end of 19th century destroyed by unreasonable arrogance its head - James Brody. The father considers himself the descendant of aristocrats and in every possible way seeks to be fixed among local "elite", humiliating ordinary citizens, colleagues from craft, neighbors. His wife and children live in dread and humiliations. The wife is afraid even to tell about the problems with health and slowly dies away. In a difficult situation the tyrant turns out the oldest daughter, and she should test a set of dangers. Unreasoned trade policy leads James to ruin. The son himself eventually runs from sneers and mockeries of the father. Brody forces the younger daughter to prepare for examinations, without paying attention to her health and anguish. The tragedy behind the tragedy, obstinacy, lack of the slightest flexibility in behavior leads to final fracture of family.
Good novel.

in Russian:


Кожедуб Иван Никитович "Ищущий боя"

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Покрышкин Александр Иванович "Познать себя в бою"

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Мемуары двух прославленных советских лётчиков-истребителей, двух трижды Героев Советского Союза, двух самых результативных лётчиков стран антигитлеровской коалиции.

Я прочитал обе эти книги последовательно - одну за другой. У каждого лётчика - своя судьба, но есть и общие черты, объединяющие обоих советских асов:
1) Родились в обычных семьях, с детства работали, настойчиво учились. Стали пилотами, пришли в военную авиацию.
2) Творчески относились к своему делу:
- анализировали свой боевой опыт (работа над ошибками), опыт коллег, других лётчиков, даже врагов;
- внимательно изучали самолёт, чтобы досконально знать его возможности;
- разрабатывали и лично отрабатывали новые приёмы воздушного боя и других задач истребительной авиации (например, прикрытие бомбардировщиков, штурмовиков; патрулирование и др.)
3) Понимали значение хорошей физической формы для боевого лётчика (перегрузки, кислородное голодание на высоте (если нет кислородной маски), большие физические и психологические нагрузки) и регулярно тренировались.
4) Не только учились новым элементам, новой тактике сами, но и обучали мастерству своих товарищей, понимая, что делают общее дело.
5) Основную часть воздушных побед одержали во второй половине войны (после 1942 года):
- Покрышкина - опытного лётчика, рвавшегося сбивать вражеские самолёты, командование отправляло на штурмовку и разведку, ругало за его за новаторские приёмы воздушного боя, слишком долго отказывалось менять устаревшую групповую тактику;
- Кожедуб в служил лётчиком-инструктором в военном училище и на фронт попал лишь в 1943 году.
6) Были смелыми и находчивыми.

Отличные книги, написанные незаурядными авторами.


Кронин Арчибальд Джозеф "Замок Броуди"

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Драма шотландской семьи конца 19 в., разрушенной непомерной гордыней главы семейства Джеймса Броуди. Отец считает себя потомком аристократов и всячески стремится закрепиться среди местной "элиты", унижая обычных горожан, коллег по ремеслу, соседей. Его жена и дети живут в постоянном страхе и унижениях. Жена боится даже сказать о своих проблемах со здоровьем и медленно угасает. В непростой ситуации тиран выгоняет из дома старшую дочь, и ей приходится испытать множество опасностей. Непродуманная торговая политика приводит Джеймса к разорению. Сын в конце концов сам сбегает от насмешек и издевательств отца. Броуди заставляет младшую дочь готовиться к экзаменам, не обращая внимания на её здоровье и душевные муки. Трагедия за трагедией, упрямство, отсутствие малейшей гибкости в поведении приводит к полному разрушению семьи.
Хороший роман.
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