Caroline Berg
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I know this was somewhat touched on with the last cut-scene question, but I felt it deserved it's own day.

I prefer to just watch cut-scenes, and not to have to push buttons to make the dialogue move forward or to dodge random fights. But that's just me. Wondering if other people enjoy just letting the cut-scenes flow by, or feel the need to get in some button action?
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Sithrak - The god who hates you unconditionally
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If there's some meaningful dialogue choice, I'm fine with that, but I'd be hard pressed to remember a game that actually did that (Well, maybe Indigo Prophecy, Heavy Rain etc... But those games are like 90% interactive cutscenes, so they're a special case).

Otherwise, I despise "press X to not die" style quicktime events. Again Indigo Prophecy, Heavy Rain etc. get a pass there because your performance in the quicktime events determines how the story continues (ie. the QT events are actually supposed to be the gameplay) and isn't just asking you to press a freaking button to avoid restarting the damn cutscene.

Cutscenes are useful to give the game a bit of pacing, introduce little breaks, realign your mood and expectations etc... Forcing people to react during their break is just damn annoying, it's like those moronic 80's kids cartoons that were made by people who thought that if they ever stopped making stupid random noise for even just a minute, their audience would immediately lose interest and run away. It's not engaging me, it's stressing me out for no payoff.
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Another vote against "press X to not die."

In the last few years, I feel like games that do this have been considerably more generous with the input window, so it goes from being annoying to simply unnecessary.
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Krzysztof Zięba
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adularia25 wrote:

I prefer to just watch cut-scenes, and not to have to push buttons to make the dialogue move forward or to dodge random fights.

I'm with you on this one. When I do make a choice or when I am expected to have some input, I'd rather it's done as its own thing. I don't mind making tough moment-to-moment decisions in dialogues in The Walking Dead: A TellTale Game Series - The Complete First Season, since I consider it the main mechanic of the game, so I don't treat them as cutscenes.

I know this goes against this medium's biggest strength, but if you're doing a cutscene just let me enjoy it. Like I mentioned in the previous thread, I treat cutscenes as a way to relax, and I'm one of the people who also treats them as the rewards they were meant to be back in the day when you'd move from the game's graphics to an impressive pre-rendered cinematic. I find that a cutscene lets you loosen muscles, and give a momentary respite from gameplay.
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Luke Stirling
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I fall into what looks to be the majority camp on this one. The QTE in cutscene thing annoys me no end. Not least because I think it undermines the actual utility of a cutscene, namely that it can be a break in tempo on either side of a large setpiece challenge. By instilling a tension that you constantly have to keep your eye out for QTE notifications while viewing a cutscene, you rob the player of any chance to take that moment to either build anticipation for the what is to come, or to bask in the moment of success in the challenge just overcome.
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David Winn
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I think a good example of the "press X not to die" cut-scenes are the boulder dodging cut-scenes in Resident Evil 4. I did not like them. Some of the ones in that game are not bad (like the fight scene with Krauser) but overall I don't like to have switch from observing the scene to being in the scene. (Especially when it is something Leon should be able to handle without my help. Like running from a boulder.)

I do like dialogue choices in cut scenes if they are done well. Like in Alpha Protocol. The game lets me know that the whole game I will be interactive in the cut scenes, and I am fine with that.
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The thing about interactive cut-scenes is they seem to always come down to pressing a button at the right time when prompted. If I wanted to do that I would play a rhythm game. If you want to give choices in dialogue or stuff like that I don't mind but button tapping mini-games are just annoying to me.

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If the player is interacting I don't consider it a cutscene. I would call it a mini-game.

-I forgot the term QTE. Yes, it is a QTE not a cutscene.

If the question is whether I like QTEs. No, I don't think I do.
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Seth Brown
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HATE. Games are for gaming. Cut-scenes are for watching.

One of the worst games ever, Dragon's Lair in the arcade, was just an endless series of Interactive QTE/Cutscenes. A cartoon which either ended with you leaving the room or dying depending on whether you pressed the instantly-appearing thing instantly. A hundred times in a row.
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I like QTEs because they give me something to do while the cutscene is playing. But I would prefer not to have cutscenes and do everything in-game.
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Amy
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I don't like quick time events in cut-scenes. I love the Mass Effect (Core Series) series but I hated the fact they inserted paragon/renegade QTEs (interupts) in some cut scenes. I especially hated it when I was watching the scene closely and still missed it. But I will say that the Renegade interrupts were very satisfying sometimes. I just wish I didn't have to use a QTE to get them. I generally hate QTEs. Give me live action or give me a cut scene, anything in between is just annoying.





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Simon Woodward
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I hate QTEs. I saw an online panel discussion the other day, and one guy said the problem is, video games are best when you forget about the controls and just play the game. But QTEs break this so badly by actually putting the controls right there on the screen! Awful.
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Agent J
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Well, maybe that's why nobody else liked Shenmue 2. Thing is full of QTEs. Loooooved it. That was my favorite thing about it. Most of the action happened in QTEs. It's a very story-driven game. I liked it because that was the game. I don't think I'd like it being thrown into Final Fantasy, for the reason said above - it breaks you out of the immersion.
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Andy
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So far I've enjoyed games I've played with Quick Time Events... I can get a bit distracted during cut scenes, so I often skip them if able... if they are unskippable, then it's nice to have a reason to pay more close attention.

On the subject of dialogue choices... these days I find that a bit meh.. Only in a few cases are the choices that meaningful, and a game that really manages to pull it off is probably going to require more time commitment than I'm able to give it... an exception might be The Walking Dead, but even then I've only played the first couple of episodes of season 1 because I need to be in the mood to play it, and have the time to complete it in one sitting (this is a personal preference).
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Adam
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I despise quick time events. Create cut scenes I want to watch for their own sake, and don't make me play Simon, or pound my controller mindlessly while I do. If I were the paranoid sort, I'd say it was a conspiracy between developers and controller manufacturers, trying to get gamers to wear out their controllers more quickly.
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Ian S.
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I am somewhat ambivalent about QTE's...there have been games that I enjoyed them, games where I've hated them, and games where they were so minor they probably could have just been avoided altogether.

If I was to be pushed to give a definite yay/nay answer, I'd say nay.
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M@tthijs
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Never encountered interactive cutscenes. That said:

Cutscenes are for watching.
If you have to do something in a cutscene, it is no longer a cutscene but a videogame. And from what I read above, mostly a pretty bad one.
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David Winn
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Osirus wrote:
HATE. Games are for gaming. Cut-scenes are for watching.

One of the worst games ever, Dragon's Lair in the arcade, was just an endless series of Interactive QTE/Cutscenes. A cartoon which either ended with you leaving the room or dying depending on whether you pressed the instantly-appearing thing instantly. A hundred times in a row.

I think Dragon's Lair could be an exception. The game IS one big interactive cut scene, and doesn't pretend to be anything else. But that is what is supposed to be. It's not a normal game ruined by cut scenes that require button presses. But I don't like the game either, which probably explains why there are not still games like this in the arcade.

I think some publishers must think we have the attention span of a puppy with ADHD, and if we are allowed to go more than five minutes without input being required, we will fall asleep or something. I can imagine a group of executives evaluating a game and saying: "They bought this game to play, not to watch. Do you think you are a movie producer? Have more events where they press buttons! We want the buttons to wear out so they will buy more controllers!" And the developers sigh heavily and a little part of their souls die.
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Sarah Reed
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I like dialogue choices, but hate the ones where I have to hit the right buttons in a sequence to survive. I also hate the ones that are timed. I just don't think that quickly.

Most of the time, I'd just prefer to watch, especially if they wrote the story well.
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I like the idea of dialog choices, but not how I have seen them implemented. Usually there is a right choice and a wrong one. Where something positive happens if you make the right choice, or perhaps the game simply advances. And a negative choice where something bad happens or the game does not progress.

That isn't what I am looking for in game interaction.

In Shadowrun on the SNES, you can choose what topic to converse with each NPC. Sounds neat in practice, until you have a list of hundreds of topics, and each conversation with an NPC lasts an hour for fear you will not talk to the right person about the right topic. And each NPC had about three possible responses, except for the unique responses when you finally talked to the right person about a topic they had something to say about.
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