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p55carroll
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Zimeon wrote:
I frankly don't understand the question.

That's the most interesting part of this thread to me, as I'm wondering what would make my question hard to understand. Some have responded in a way that indicates they get what I mean pretty easily, but others apparently don't get it at all.

So, if you're one who doesn't understand the question, and after reading replies in this thread you finally do come to an understanding, please tell me how I could have worded the question better.

One thing I did in a reply above was add the phrase "Role-playing aside." Does that help? Because I was not trying to ask whether the roles you play in games are different from the way you are in everyday life. I would assume they almost always are. In real life, you're not likely to go around acting like the protagonist in your RPG.

But while you're playing a role in a game, you're also the human being playing that game (and the role). And you're the same human being in real life, when you're not playing a game. But human beings are complex critters, and their various personality traits show up in different degrees at different times. That's what my question is about.

I'm asking if a good friend, watching you play a game, might say, "Wow--you sure seem like a different person when you play games than when you're doing other stuff." Obviously "different person" is just a figure of speech; the friend is just noticing that your behavior (observed aspects of your personality) changes when you play games.

Does any of that explanation help?
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What I find most confusing about this thread is that I know that Patrick does not play multiplayer videogames. So I assumed we were not talking about interactions with other people, either in terms of playstyle (the 'Bob is deceitful when playing cards' example) or attitude (the dime-a-dozen toxic online troll that we're all familiar with).

But then Patrick himself is giving non-videogaming examples of people-to-people interaction.

So for me, personally, there are at least three fairly different inquiries tangled together here, and even if those were separated, we get into whether or not we share very basic assumptions about the premises involved, and I can tell that we don't.

And to be honest, it feels rude for me to go into it further.
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p55carroll
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JohnRayJr wrote:
For me, personally, there are at least three fairly different inquiries tangled together here, and even if those were separated, we get into whether or not we share very basic assumptions about the premises involved, and I can tell that we don't.

And to be honest, it feels rude for me to go into it further.

You've got me curious, and I have a hunch you could add something interesting and enlightening in line with what you say above. Maybe I did unwittingly conflate a few things or make some questionable assumptions.

Anyhow, it's up to you what you decide to say, if anything more. But don't hold back on my account. I'll just thicken my skin as necessary.
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Patrick Carroll wrote:
JohnRayJr wrote:
For me, personally, there are at least three fairly different inquiries tangled together here, and even if those were separated, we get into whether or not we share very basic assumptions about the premises involved, and I can tell that we don't.

And to be honest, it feels rude for me to go into it further.

You've got me curious, and I have a hunch you could add something interesting and enlightening in line with what you say above. Maybe I did unwittingly conflate a few things or make some questionable assumptions.

Anyhow, it's up to you what you decide to say, if anything more. But don't hold back on my account. I'll just thicken my skin as necessary.


Well, I look at this from a few directions.

1. Do you communicate and relate to other people within competitive games differently from how you communicate and relate to them outside of games? Sub-question: how does the anonymity or distance of online play factor in?

2. If you are playing a single-player game, are their aspects of your personality, mentality, quirks etc that end up being expressed in the game? Would these traits surprise people who know you outside of games? Sub-question: are games a stress-reliever for you?

3. When you are socializing via or around games, do you think people get a different impression of you than they otherwise might? While this is connected to the first question, I feel it's particularly relevant for videogames, given that people can have personas on forums (like this one), facebook/twitter, twitch-chat, as a streamer, during co-operative play, etc. All of these tend to be quite different from folks eyeing one another in a poker game.

4. Do you feel uncomfortable participating in flagrantly immoral and/or cruel behavior in-game, and does the characterization of that 'role' change this to any significant degree?

(When I said I was hesitant to be rude, what I meant is that I assume there is one of these you want to talk about more than the others, and I know from my experience on other forums that it gets on my nerves when people 'run with the ball' away from the original question)
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JohnRayJr wrote:
Well, I look at this from a few directions.

1. Do you communicate and relate to other people within competitive games differently from how you communicate and relate to them outside of games? Sub-question: how does the anonymity or distance of online play factor in?

2. If you are playing a single-player game, are their aspects of your personality, mentality, quirks etc that end up being expressed in the game? Would these traits surprise people who know you outside of games? Sub-question: are games a stress-reliever for you?

3. When you are socializing via or around games, do you think people get a different impression of you than they otherwise might? While this is connected to the first question, I feel it's particularly relevant for videogames, given that people can have personas on forums (like this one), facebook/twitter, twitch-chat, as a streamer, during co-operative play, etc. All of these tend to be quite different from folks eyeing one another in a poker game.

4. Do you feel uncomfortable participating in flagrantly immoral and/or cruel behavior in-game, and does the characterization of that 'role' change this to any significant degree?

(When I said I was hesitant to be rude, what I meant is that I assume there is one of these you want to talk about more than the others, and I know from my experience on other forums that it gets on my nerves when people 'run with the ball' away from the original question)

Wow. Sounds like "Ghostpants" could make four more QotDs out of those.

Or this thread could splay into a few directions, if people are interested in pursuing those lines.

It's not my thread anyway (I just submitted the question), so FWIW I'm happy with any way it happens to go.

For now, I'll be putting some thought into those four questions.
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Patrick Carroll wrote:
Zimeon wrote:
I frankly don't understand the question.

That's the most interesting part of this thread to me, as I'm wondering what would make my question hard to understand. Some have responded in a way that indicates they get what I mean pretty easily, but others apparently don't get it at all.


Well, it was badly phrased by me, because of course I do understand what the question means. Your question wasn't worded badly. My re-question was rather a way to express "it's not at all applicable to me", reason being that I don't have one "gaming persona", I have one per game.

Also, my first reaction was that I felt that I didn't understand how this could be applicable to anyone, because I felt it natural to have one gaming persona per game, but it does seem from the replies that people tend to have a general over-arching one.

In Saint's Row 2, I am a violent, senseless killer, whose main source of joy is to run over as many pedestrians as possible. In Just Cause 3, I am more of a one-man havoc-wreaking piece of asshole, whose main purpose is to hook cars together, and possibly try to string people to the wings of a windmill. In Saboteur, I'm a silent guy who takes much care not to hurt civilians, but who has great fun sneaking around blowing things up. In The Wolf Among Us, I'm a tired, former violent guy who still has it in him, but who really really is fed up with violence and don't want to fight unless provoked, in which case he goes entirely bananas.

So my gaming persona fully depends on what setting I am in, and what kind of mood the game gives, and then I automatically set up some kind of character in my head, and I play that one. Of course, this is influenced by what the game encourages to do, which is why there is almost one per game.

So a friend watching me play a game is just as likely to say "this is so typical of you" as "you are really merciless in games, aren't you?"
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I usually use my name as my gaming persona so there is little difference between the two.
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Patrick Carroll wrote:
Zimeon wrote:
I frankly don't understand the question.

That's the most interesting part of this thread to me, as I'm wondering what would make my question hard to understand. Some have responded in a way that indicates they get what I mean pretty easily, but others apparently don't get it at all.

So, if you're one who doesn't understand the question, and after reading replies in this thread you finally do come to an understanding, please tell me how I could have worded the question better.

One thing I did in a reply above was add the phrase "Role-playing aside." Does that help? Because I was not trying to ask whether the roles you play in games are different from the way you are in everyday life. I would assume they almost always are. In real life, you're not likely to go around acting like the protagonist in your RPG.

But while you're playing a role in a game, you're also the human being playing that game (and the role). And you're the same human being in real life, when you're not playing a game. But human beings are complex critters, and their various personality traits show up in different degrees at different times. That's what my question is about.

I'm asking if a good friend, watching you play a game, might say, "Wow--you sure seem like a different person when you play games than when you're doing other stuff." Obviously "different person" is just a figure of speech; the friend is just noticing that your behavior (observed aspects of your personality) changes when you play games.

Does any of that explanation help?

Not really. It's hard for me to know what you mean because I'm always role-playing the characters I play in games, and those characters do things I would never do in real life. They aren't me, they might share one facet of my personality, but the rest is pretty unrelatable to who I am. I can compartmentalize myself this way - after all, I do it when I write characters in books and when I create NPCs for the role-playing games I run.

So no, unlike you, I'm not the same person I am in real life when I'm playing a game. Not in the same way you mean.

But if we go by my reactions to games, I frequently swear at them while enraged, and cry at the drop of a hat based on touching story lines, so that is 100% like who I am when I'm not gaming.
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adularia25 wrote:
It's hard for me to know what you mean because I'm always role-playing the characters I play in games, and those characters do things I would never do in real life.

Thanks. That's the impression I was starting to form--that a lot of gamers do much more role-playing than I do.

I was hoping that might be something I could try, because maybe it'd keep me from reacting so strongly to game events (after all, it's only the character who's doing or experiencing those things, not me). But then you say this:

Quote:
But if we go by my reactions to games, I frequently swear at them while enraged, and cry at the drop of a hat based on touching story lines, so that is 100% like who I am when I'm not gaming.

Guess role-playing won't help with my overreacting to unexpected events in games, then.

Maybe it would help with something else--like getting more enjoyment out of stories in games.

Anyway, thanks for the reply.
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Quote:
Are you more (or less) aggressive in games than in real life?

Depends. Games which *require you to be more aggressive (fighting games, shooters, etc.) aside, no. In games where one needs to choose between violence and diplomacy I usually side with diplomacy.

Or if you mean 'aggressive' in how doggedly I pursue victory, then I guess I am more aggressive in games than I am in real life. I don't like conflict so if I find I'm surrounded by highly motivated individuals I tend to leave them to fight it out among themselves and back off. Not a great personality trait, but it is who I am.

Quote:
Are you more (or less) methodical in games than in real life?

Another "depends". Not all games give you the freedom to be "methodical". Bot for those that do - I would say I'm as methodical in games as I am in real life as that's how I approach most problems.

Quote:
Do you "go with your gut" more (or less) in games than in real life?

I tend not to 'go with my gut' at any time. It has never led me right.

Quote:
Do you take more (or fewer) risks in games than in real life?

I take more risks in games because I know there is no true risk to me. In real life I take very few risks if I can help it.

Quote:
Do you react better (or worse) to setbacks in games than in real life?

Easy. I react far better to setbacks in games than I do in real life. Partially because of the prior question - games don't have real consequences so why react at all other than "darn, haha"?

Quote:
Role-playing aside, do you tend to make the same kinds of choices in games as in real life?

For the most part, yes. Sometimes I won't necessarily role-play but if I'm trying to be a completionist or just otherwise see what the other half of the game looks like, I might make decisions counter to what I would do in real life.
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Gerdion wrote:
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Do you react better (or worse) to setbacks in games than in real life?

Easy. I react far better to setbacks in games than I do in real life. Partially because of the prior question - games don't have real consequences so why react at all other than "darn, haha"?

I just wish I could react that way in games. Though it may be irrational, I overreact in games even more than IRL (and I overreact there too).

It's because the consequences are irrelevant to me. What's foremost in my mind is that I wanted and expected one thing and then was suddenly blindsided and got something very different and unwelcome instead. No matter how often I experience that, it's still unthinkable to me, so I'm taken aback each and every time.

The reason it's worse for me in games is that I figure I've got things under control there. I've played the game many times; I know what I'm doing and how things typically go. So it's doubly shocking if things take a bad turn. In real life, I know darned well I don't have everything under control, and that I comprehend only a tiny sliver of what life's all about, so surprises aren't that surprising.
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