The Hotness
Games|People|Company
Twilight Struggle
Dominion Online
Hearthstone: Heroes of Warcraft
The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim
Final Fantasy XV
Overwatch
Assassin's Creed
Medieval II: Total War
Kingdom of Loathing
LEGO Harry Potter: Years 1-4
F-15 Strike Eagle
Borderlands 2
The Secret World
Deponia
Remember Me
Destiny
The Escapists
The Talos Principle
ARK: Survival Evolved
Far Cry: Primal
Unravel
Steam: Rails To Riches
Layers of Fear
Patchwork
Pathfinder Adventures
Baseball Highlights 2045
Refunct
Fallout 3
Final Fantasy IX
Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic II – The Sith Lords
Civilization II
The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening
Paperboy
HλLF-LIFE²
Baldur's Gate II: Shadows of Amn
Hitman 2: Silent Assassin
Quest for Glory I: So You Want to Be a Hero
Monkey Island 2: LeChuck's Revenge
Psychonauts
Age of Empires III
Wii Fit Plus
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
Bubble Bobble
Breath of Fire
Speedball 2: Brutal Deluxe
BioShock
Ancient Domains of Mystery
Sanitarium
Tales of Monkey Island Chapter 5: Rise of the Pirate God
Rome: Total War – Alexander
Information
Primary Name
PLATO
Alternate Names
 Corrections
 Clone
 Customize View
xml RSS Feed 
Facebook Twitter Delicious Google
ObjectID: 17617
Description Edit | History

From Wikipedia:

PLATO (Programmed Logic for Automated Teaching Operations) was the first (ca. 1960, on ILLIAC I) generalized computer assisted instruction system, and, by the late 1970s, comprised several thousand terminals worldwide on nearly a dozen different networked mainframe computers. Originally, PLATO was built by the University of Illinois and functioned for four decades, offering coursework (elementary–university) to UIUC students, local schools, and other universities. Several descendant systems still operate.

The PLATO project was assumed by the Control Data Corporation (CDC), who built the machines with which PLATO operated at the University. CDC President William Norris planned to make PLATO a force in the computer world; the last production PLATO system was shut down in 2006 (coincidentally, just a month after Norris died), yet it established key on-line concepts: forums, message boards, online testing, e-mail, chat rooms, picture languages, instant messaging, remote screen sharing, and multi-player games.

In 1960, the first system, PLATO I, operated on the local ILLIAC I computer. It included a television set for display and a special keyboard for navigating the system's function menus; PLATO II, in 1961, featured two users at once. PLATO III allowed "anyone" to design new lesson modules using their TUTOR programming language, conceived in 1967. PLATO III could simultaneously run up to 20 lessons, and was used by a local facilities in Champaign-Urbana that could enter the system with their custom terminals. In 1972 a new system named PLATO IV was ready for operation. The PLATO IV terminal was a major innovation. It included Bitzer's orange plasma display invention which incorporated both memory and bitmapped graphics into one display. This plasma display included fast vector line drawing capability and ran at 1260 baud, rendering 60 lines or 180 characters per second. The display was a 512x512 bitmap, with both character and vector plotting done by hardwired logic. Users could provide their own characters to support rudimentary bitmap graphics. Compressed air powered a piston-driven microfiche image selector that permitted colored images to be projected on the back of the screen under program control. The PLATO IV display also included a 16-by-16 grid infrared touch panel allowing students to answer questions by touching anywhere on the screen.

Source: Wikipedia, "PLATO (computer system)," available under the CC-BY-SA License.

More Information Edit | History
This page does not exist. You can edit this page to create it.
Linked Items
Relationship: Sort: Genre: Theme: Mode: Media:
Pg. 1
Rank N/A
Num Ratings 0
Average Rating 0.00
Average Weight 0.00
Num Owned 0
Prev. Owned 0
For Trade 0
Want in Trade 0
Wishlist 0
Comments 0
Release Date 1974-03-01
Updating...
Thumbs Up
Images
Gallery:
1 « Pg. {{module.params.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
No images found
Updating...
Thumbs Up
{{data.config.moduletitle}} Relationship:
[] [Forums »] [Post »] [Search »]
1 « Pg. {{module.params.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
No threads found
{{thread.numrecommend}} {{thread.subject}}
Last Post {{thread.lastpostdate|truncate:"10"}} Posted {{thread.postdate|truncate:"10"}}
{{thread.user.username|truncate:"10"}} {{thread.numposts-1}}
Updating...
Thumbs Up
{{data.config.moduletitle}} Relationship:
[] [Forums »] [Post »] [Search »]
1 « Pg. {{module.params.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
No threads found
{{thread.numrecommend}} {{thread.subject}}
Last Post {{thread.lastpostdate|truncate:"10"}} Posted {{thread.postdate|truncate:"10"}}
{{thread.user.username|truncate:"10"}} {{thread.numposts-1}}
Updating...
Thumbs Up
{{title}}
1 « Pg. {{module.params.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
No posts found
{{post.numpositive}} {{post.title}}
by
{{post.numcomments}}
Updating...
Thumbs Up
GeekLists
[Browse »] [Summary »]
1 « Pg. {{module.params.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
No lists found
{{list.numpositive}} {{list.title}} {{list.username|truncate:"10"}} {{list.numitems}}
{{list.lastreplydate|truncate:"10"}} {{list.postdate|truncate:"10"}}
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.